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of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
and family of the ladies auxiliary. america honors your service as well. also, governor jan brewer is here of arizona. and mayor phil gordon, our host, here in phoenix. i want too acknowledge president dr. joe shirley jr., president of the navajo nation. and this wasn't on my original card, but this is just an extraordinary story and you may have already heard from her, but i want to publicly acknowledge and thank mrs. helen denton, the secretary to dwight eisenhower who typed up the orders for the normandy invasion and is here today and what an extraordinary story that is. so -- [ applause ] members of the veterans of foreign wars, i am honored and humbled to stand before you as commander in chief of the finest military the world has ever known. we're joined by some of those who make it the finest force in the world. from luke air force base, members of the 56th fighter wing. whether you wear the uniform today or wore it decades ago, you remind us of a fundamental truth. it's not the powerful weapons that make our military the strongest in the world, it's not the sophisticated system that
fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> scottish officials were already under fire even before they made it official yesterday and allowed a convicted terrorist to fly home to libya to die. the outrage only deepened today after these pictures of libyans celebrating abdel baset al megrahi's release were broadcast around the world. al megrahi, of course, was convicted for the 1988 bombing of pan am 103 over lockerbie, scotland. the terror attack killed 270 people. and today, once again, many people were demanding to know just why had he been set free. this matter of justice is once again our "lead focus" tonight. >> reporter: abdel baset al megrahi should not be welcomed back to tripoli, that was the message, the warning to libya from president obama in america. the demand responsible for the deaths of 270 people, the biggest terrorist attack in britain was treated more like a celebrity or royalty changed into a dark suit, he was met off of the plane and then repeatedly hugged by colonel gadhafi's own so
. very happy to see all of you here. today's hearing will focus on insuring that america leads the clean energy transformation as we address the threat posed by climate change. i want to welcome our witnesses who will share their insights and expertise on this critical subject. we are facing two historic challenges in america today, a deep economic recession and the threat of unchecked global warming. during this hearing we'll examine the ways in which federal initiatives are already addressing both of these challenges. and about additional steps we can take to provide incentives for clean energy development to transform the american economy. this country can and should be a leader of the clean energy revolution. clean energy and climate legislation provides the certainty that companies need and the signal businesses are looking for to mobilize capital and harness the greatest source of power we have in this great country, american ingenuity. clean energy legislation is jobs legislation by creating powerful incentives for clean energy it will create millions of new jobs in america, it'll
," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- china expresses its strong opposition. it does not like tie 1's invitation to the dollar llama. and he sailed around the road, but he is not old enough to drive. a british teenager complete the voyage. -- and he sailed around the world, but he is not old enough to drive. hello to you. bbc has discovered many cases of corruption involving iraqi security forces. the police and army are widely blamed for failing to stop the current wave of bombings. there is concern that there is endemic corruption undermining their efforts. two months ago, they took over responsibility for security in iraq as american troops pulled back. the life-and-death question now -- can they prove they are up to the job? we have this report from andrew north. >> the attack on the foreign ministry. a suicide bomber last week. seconds before it detonated it right outside. the foreign minister tells us the iraqi army, police were partly responsible. >> the iraqi security forces should have done a better job because there w
. >> public money, and i'm sure. >> my taxes? >> america's cable companies greeted c-span as a public service, a private business initiative, no government mandate or money -- that was held c-span was created. >> congress has delayed action on health care until after the august recess. this morning, we talk about this on "washington journal." host: tell us about the progress that was made on monday and what the senate may or may not be doing. guest: the house energy and commerce committee was able to pass the house democrats' version of health reform bill. they have been having a bit of trouble all along the way with some of the more conservative democrats, but they were able to make some deals and the house should take it up when they return from recess. the senate finance committee is working on a bipartisan health care bill right now and they will be working on this all week. i do not expect to see a final bill from them this week. aba proposal or something like that, but nothing complete. they have sent us a deadline of the 15th. probably after the recess. host: what about the fact that t
hundreds. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrificed to bring about? >>> how to measure success in america's other war in afghanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look at an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in the middle of the war, welcome aboard an air ambulance. >>> and germany wants a million electric vehicles on the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if you woke up this morning and turned on the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement about what you were hearing out of afghanistan and iraq. more than 5,000 american troops have died in those two countries since troops were de
the celebration by singing god bless america and i hope you'll join them. . . the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. he had his sleeves and wakeful nights. he had his nightmares and yet he dreamt a dream that was trapped of the heart -- that was a draft of the heart and only his great heart could hold. he gave flesh to that the dream in the noble house of his thought where the sick were healed, the sphere broken, and the stranger welcomed. it is the age-old dream of the profits -- of the profitphets. there will be a bank would ge-- there will be a bank with yet -- there will be a banquet yet. the laugh, the sound of roses, the music -- may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ♪ ♪ dodd bless america -- god bless america ♪ landed that i love the ♪ stand beside her ♪ and the guide her ♪ through the night ♪ with the light from above ♪ from the mountain to the prairie ♪ to the ocean ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ died bless america -- god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand beside her ♪ and a
that while america has turned over security to the iraqis, iraq is not secure. >>> facts of life. new insight into america's health. we are living longer, and the death rates for major diseases are falling. >>> dirty dealers. extraordinary undercover video reveals just how easy it is to buy a gun illegally. >>> and, sour notes. the proud members of the truly terrible orchestra, and the the proud members of the truly terrible orchestra, and the music they make. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good evening. we begin tonight with two stories literally about life and death. we have new insight into the state of america's health. we are living longer than ever. there are advances against major diseases. minorities enjoy better health, and we'll get to that in a moment. but we also got a reminder that sudden death at the hands of terrorists is still a reality in iraq. a wave of explosions throughout baghdad killed nearly 100 people and injured hundreds more today. and the 130,000 u.s. troops in that country could do little to help. under the terms of the security agreement, demanded by the iraqi
. >> the government has plunged america from the number one nation to be number one in debt it nation on the planet. >> keep the government out of it. we are doing just fine. >> this is a vehicle. it is taking us down a path of total socialism. >> a new regime in washington would dismiss a nationwide grassroots uprising. >> [inaudible] >> if you want to be let out of here, you are welcome to go. >> i say to all of them, put your ear to the ground. a terrifying rumble is shaking this nation. listen to us, or your days are numbered. >> i want to speak my mind before i leave. >> i do not like being lied to and i do not like being lied about. >> i understand why people are angry. i am angry, too. >> across the nation, a giant is awakening that has never been defeated. that name is "we, the people." we are sleeping no more. >> we are tired of this. that is why everyone in this room is so ticked off. >> this happened in 1776 and it is happening again. americans are shouting in one voice. enough is enough. return the public to its rightful owners, the citizens of the united states of america. on this nigh
with america with over 300 million americans you have to pick a handful of big ideas, talk about them and leslie and gradually over time you'll build an effect in a residence and the country it will learn and have a genuine dialogue. >> host: san diego, you are on thair, i like to talk about how the american enterprise institute that mr. gingrich is associated with is highlighted in the book frequently. i would like to address some key aspects that have not been brought up. a first of all, mr. gingrich i it was at a presentation and was unable to ask a questiobecause of the democratic moderator there wouldn't call in may because i had a challenge richard perle the day before about agenda associated with that you. the project with a new american century which has been disbanded only in name only and you are a propagandist of these people. you can't look yourself up in that wall is a book about the power of low lobby called the israel lobby and u.s. foreign policy. there is a media blackout in america. 60 minutes and c is refusing to do a segment on it yet these the esteemed political s
: this is the national desk. they cover america. this is the foreign desk, covering the globe. every picture that comes into fox news channel comes through the media desk. here on "the live desk" those pictures will always be on the right-hand side of the screen. juliet: in the top box we are waiting for president obama to begin speaking in phoenix, talking about the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and as we wait, the health care debate rages on. the president last week said that a public option is an absolute must in any health care bill, but now the white house could be changing its tune. and an update on a story that we broke. e-mails from the white house going to people who never asked for them. now the white house is responding. in the middle box, a tragedy in the sky. fighter jets colliding as they rehearse for an air show. in the bottom box, hurricane season is in full swing. the florida panhandle is dealing with the aftermath of the claudette and now hurricane bill is picking up strength. trace: we begin with health care and the question over president obama's plan for health insurance is dead or
of which i think we must respect. >> beth mendelsohn with voice of america, the afghanistan service. if one of the candidates doesn't get 50% and this goes into a second round and things get complicated there, what are the constitutional laws that are in place? can karzai call the loya jirga? and also if it goes the way some of the things did in iran, what is the united states prepared to do in these circumstances? >> rinna? >> i'd like barney to comment on this as well. if there is a security situation then there are stipulations where a loya jirga can be called. but i'd like barney to speak in more detail about this as well. >> well, i'm not sure what your question is about. according to the constitution if no one gets more than 50% of the vote, then a second round has to be held within two weeks of the date of announce mentd of the result. perhaps your question is what is -- if there is civil conflict and it is not possible to do that. we of course do not want to address hypothetical questionsb3 like that. there is an international presence in afghan government that is our partner and if
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
, for america, the defender of a dream. >> ted kennedy followed his to brothers, jack and bobby into politics, and after their assassinations, he became the family patriarch and eventually a political icon. in nearly five decades in the senate, he was the voice of the liberal party wing. in the 1980 speech, it was a ted kennedy classic. >> for all of those whose careers have been our concern, the work goes on, the cause endures, the hobe still lives, and the dream john never die. -- the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. ♪ >> love him or hate him -- and there are still some ted kennedy haters out there -- washington will not be the same without him. he died at his home in massachusetts this week at the age of 77. he was diagnosed with a brain tumor in may of 2008. we knew and he knew there was no cure, only delaying action. >> the torch will be passed again to a new generation of americans. the hope rises again endangering lives on. >> despite his weakened condition, kennedy made an appearance at barack obama's convention a year ago and the inauguration in january. he spent his
and america'sha amased to have m back at this tle. welce. >> sorry you had to bring e. >> i joy hearing the stories out the ball gi la time here. (laughter) >> rose: w are you differt today? >> you kw, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i dn't know in 1995. > rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, sang just relax. you know, ihought 1995 en we conservatives took over coness, we owned the world. that w could pass atever we wanteto pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go tohe white house, be signednd it would be l. and what i found out was james mason was a pret smart guy. we darted further right than amica was ready to go. and you ha moderat republicans and democts in the senate. it sort ofhiseled off the edges of tt agenda. the same thing's happening now. and docrats have goneoo far left. thespent too much money. they're movi faster th the middlef american political thought is ready to go. and there learning th same lesson. >>ose: are they doing that because it is their ideaologic place or are they doi that beca
he did lives on. for his family, he was a bargain. for america, and he was the defender of a dream. -- for his family, he was of guardian. >> we look at ted kennedy's legacy as the leading liberal in washington. welcome to "bbc world news." , broadcast you our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. >> i am mike embley in london. 70% -- 17% of the vote now counted. president karzai edges against his main rival. and one of iraq's influential leaders has died in exile in tehran. >> hello. he was the best known as american politician ever to make it -- never to make it to the white house. senator kidney -- kidnapping -- center -- senator kennedy died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. he fought for so many causes, and the tributes have flowed in from friend and foe alike. but his career was limited by self-inflicted wounds. adam brooks reports. >> the death of edward kennedy, known as ted, leads a chasm in american politics. hughes was one of the most effective politicians of the last century -- he was one of the most effective politicians of the last century. his
best hope storing conservatism a america promise. am pleased to have him back at th table. lcome. >> sry you had to bring m >> i eny hearing the stories abt the ball girl lastime here. (laughter) >> rose: hoare you differentoday? >> you kno ihink -- i think i know now in 2009 what i did't know in 1995. >rose: i hope so. >> and ironically,'m counselling my liberal democratic friends, sayi just relax. you know, i tought 1995 wh we conservatives took over congrs, we owned the world. that we could pass whever we wanted pass through the house. he senate would confirm it. it would go to t white ouse, be signed ad it would be law and what iound out was james madion was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than amera was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democra in the senate. it sort of cseled off the edges of tha agenda. the same thing'sappening now. and demrats have gone t far left. they ent too much money. they're movingaster than the middle omerican litical thought is ready to go. and they' learning the same lesson. >> re: are they doing that because it is th
and america, the iranian government blames the u.s. for fueling the protests that have engulfed the country since the controversial election of president mahmoud ahmadinejad, a cause for concern as the state department follows it closely. >> sonia gallego, thanks, sonia. >>> a top official in saddam hussein's government has been convicted of helping plan the forced removal of thousands of iraqi kurds. tariq aziz was given seven years in prison yesterday on top of a 15-year sentence he's already received for crimes against humanity. aziz served as his foreign minister and deputy prime minister. >>> in afghanistan, the taliban is claiming responsibility for a deadly bombing this morning. the remote controlled bomb went off in the western city of herat. at least ten were killed in the blast including women and children. dozens others also injured. a local police chief -- a local police chief was apparent target critically wounded. >>> in a separate attack militants killed three more u.s. troops with gunfire after attacking their convoy with a roadside bomb. that brings the death toll to six. t
. what's happening to the security america has spent and sacrifice to bringabout? >>> how to measure success in america's other warn afanistan. ares its first progress report. >>> we'll take you airborne to look a an extraordinary effort by the u.s. military to save lives in t middle of the war, welcome aboard anir amlance. >>> d germanyants a million ectric vehiclesn the road by 2020. we'll plug you in on how they plan to do it. >>> fromhe world's leading reporters and analyst here's what's happeni from around the rld. this is "worfocus." made possible, in pa, by th following funder-- major support ha also been provided bthe peter g. peterson foundatio dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibity dddressing key economic allenges facing america's future. >> gd evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> if youoke up this mning and turnedn the news you might have felt a sense of discouragement aut what you were hring outf afghanistan and iraq. more tha5,000 american trps have die in those two countries nce troops were ployed to afghanistan in the fall of 2001 and iraq in e spring of 2003. and hune
. >>> tonight, i'm going to take the liberty to speak to millions of liberals across america. it's been a sad day in america. we lost our man, senator ted kennedy. lost his battle with brain cancer overnight at the age of 77. every time he was on my radio show, i referred to him as the gladiator. he loved that. he was the gladiator for the people. a fighter, a believer. he fought for labor, for worker's rights, civil rights, human rights and social justice. kennedy was the gold standard when it came to fighting for the working folk of america and he left a huge footprint in this country. he was a champion of the cause, an unselfish man who gave so much to the united states of america. but i will remember him as a fighter. now, there's a lot of talk today about his ability to cross the aisle, his bipartisanship, his work, his friendships but he never compromised his principles. he fought for them passionately. if ted kennedy was on your side, he would be in the trenches with you in the 11th hour. you could count on kennedy. >> we still cannot get a $2.15 over two years. over two years. what is
limbaugh will join me. don't miss tomorrow night's episode. from new york, good, america. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute ---www.ncicap.org---^ bret: next on "special report" the president decides against the shakeup at the federal reserve. was dick cheney right all along about the value of enhanced interrogation techniques? we will show you the evidence so far. we report. you decide. you haven't heard about a terrorist plot against this country following 9/11. new details tonight. and democrats denounce organized resistance to healthcare reform. wait until you see what's coming this week. all that, plus the all-star panel, right here, right now. welcome to washington. i'm bret bret. on a day when a pair of economic forecasts paint a picture of exploding deficits, mounting debt andizing unemployment, america's top banker is getting a vote of confidence. major garrett reports on the p president's decision to keep the head of the federal reserve on the payroll. >> the man next to me, ben bernanke, has led the fed through one of th
. this fall, and to the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. the supreme court, coming the first sunday of october on c- span. >> president obama goes back on the road tomorrow to talk about health care. he will be in belgrade, montana, to talk about his plan to overhaul the nation's health- care system. on saturday, the first family plans to spend part of the day in yellowstone. afterward, president obama has to another forum in grand junction, colorado. white house officials have said that the trip is partly aimed at encouraging people to visit national parks, as well as to get out the message on health care. this morning, "washington journal" asked to be worse if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can -- a view is if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can. have the health care protests changed your mind? beginning with a call from sun city, fla. on the independent line. what is your thinking as an independent? caller: thanks for taking my call. it has changed
and columnist ann coulter during a speech to the young america's foundation. this last about one hour and 15 minutes. >> boy, do we have a and now for you. we have ann coulter. first off, i like to welcome our viewers from c-span and a live web spain. i'm an intern with young america's foundation. young america's foundation is the premier organization that educates students on the principle of limited government, individual liberty, a strong national defense, and traditional values. for more information, please call our telephone number. or visit our web site. what did barack obama and ann coulter have in common? [laughter] nothing, thank god. [applause] ann coulter is now the author of seven "new york times was " a best-selling books, and i am sure there will be many more to come. she graduated with honors from cornell university, and no, mr. alderman, not the same school you attended. [applause] she then went on to practice law in new york city and even work for the senate judiciary committee. the conservative movement is so lucky that have an intelligent, articulate, and not to mention ex
's all somehow inevitable and that the only way for america to get ahead is for places like elkhart to be left behind. you hear that argument sometime in washington. but i know and you know that the truth is exactly the opposite. i'm here because i believe our ability to recover and to prosper as a nation depends on what happens in communities just like this one. the battle for america's future will be fought and won in places like elkhart and detroit and goshen and pittsburgh, south bend, youngstown, in cities and towns across indiana and across the midwest and across the country that have been the backbone of america. it will be won by making places like elkhart what they once were and can be again, and that is centers of innovation and entrepreneurship and ingenuity and opportunity. the whirring engines of america. we can't afford to run the race at half strength or half speed. if we hope to lead this century like we did the last century, we have to create the conditions and opportunities for places like elkhart to succeed. we have to harness the potential, the innovative and cr
again, but it did. citigroup, bank of america, nine of the firms that received bailout money paid out billions and billions in bonuses. citigroup alone which suffered losses last year got $45 billion and paid out $5.3 billion in bonuses. yet the white house has been pretty quiet. isn't the president outraged again? >> that's why he has supported things like say on pay, to make sure as we go forward at least shareholders are minding the store. we also did appoint a special master there in the treasury department to take these decisions out of political hands, someone who is supposed to be watching those firms that are getting extensive government and taxpayer money. he's certainly going to be making recommendations. >> will you assure us it won't happen again this year? remember what mr. gfineberg's description was. what he's working at is sort of balancing off the, are they going to be able to retain talent with our sense of outrage, with our sense of what's reasonable, with the sense of are we encouraging too much risk taking? we're going to trust him. >> moving on, one of the presid
speech it became clear that he's not, that america is not against this. if you complain of the interventions of the forces in iran, i would say to you, don't interfere with the home affairs of other arab captioning sponsored by rose communications >> charlie: we are in cairo, in egypt for a conversation with the president of egypt, hosni mubarak. it is my ninth interview with him. he is on the eve of a visit to washington to meet with president obama and vice president biden to talk about the middle east and other issues. it is his first trip to washington since 2004. i am pleased to have him back on this program for a conversation about the region, about the issues he sees, about his rule here in egypt for 28 years. mr. president, thank you. >> thank you. >> charlie: i come to cairo and all of the talk is about you. they say is he okay, is he healthy, does he feel good. they say he's experienced tragedy. they say is he going to run again. would this be the last term for president mubarak. you say? >> i'm not looking for, if i'm going to renew another term or something
of the book "the battle for america" join us later. >>> also, sonia sotomayor was confirmed late today by a vote of 68-31. nine republicans voted for her, and every democrat present. could that cause trouble for the republicans with latino votes next november? we'll look at that in "the politics fix." >>> and what american political celebrity was offered 40 cows and 20 goats for some guy to marry their daughter? and who said it was up to the daughter to decide? that's in tonight's "hardball sideshow." >>> we begin with the president's slipping approval ratings. now down to 50% in a new poll. patrick buchanan is an msnbc political analyst and bob shrum is a democratic analyst. let's take a look. here the quinnipiac poll numbers to look at. approve the president's performance, 50%. disapprove, 42%. that compares to only a month ago and just a month ago to 57% positive, 33% negative. now, let's look at the source of this. the quinn pi yak poll asks people how is the president handling the health care issue. there you have it, 39%. very, very low for an issue he really campaigned on. 52% o
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
, but not this time. >>> and he's america's money man. and president obama wants to keep him on the job. mr. obama revealed this morning that he'll nominate federal reserve chair, ben bernanke, nor for a second term, that announcement from martha's vineyard, where the family is vacations came through. he said bernanke has led the u.s. through the worst economic crisis that we've ever faced. he'll have to be confirmed by senate where some lawmakers might not be too happy with his first term. >>> promising news on the housing front, and it's about time. a closely watched index shows home prices have posted their first quarterly increase in 3 years. it was nearly a 3% jump from the first quarter but still down 15% from the second quarter of last year. home prices are now at home levels not seen since early 2003. >>> there's a lot of optimism about the economy in asia, but how about new york? cnn's richard quest joins us once again, but this time not from the front of the new york stock exchange, he's in brooklyn. what have you found there besides the waterfront, my friend? >> reporter: i've joined th
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
kennedy can be measured in no small part as a consequence of how we in america look at one another. how blacks look at whites, how gays looked straight, house traits lookit days. -- house streets look at today's -- how straights look at gays. and how we look at ourselves. when you were with him, you had to measure yourself against him. it always requires you to be larger than you were inclined to be. his death was not unlike his life. as we all know. overcoming pain and loss with a sense of dignity and pride that is amazing. he met his death in the same grave, generous terms that he lived his life. they could've been thinking about your father when he wrote, the will the fis fear when duty throws the gauntlet down the fate, when scorn compromises with death. this is heroism. your father was a historic figure. he was a heroic figure beyond that. i will remember and celebrate his life every single time i see a young, adolescent kids coping rather than cowering about having to make a decision about his sexuality. i will celebrate your father ever single time i see my granddaughter stand up
auxiliary. americana's your service as well. -- america honors your service as well. the governor of arizona is here as well. and mayor phil gordon, our host in phoenix. i want to acknowledge the president of the navajo nation. this was not on my original card, but you may have already heard from our, but i want to publicly acknowledge and thank the secretary to eisenhower who typed up the orders for the normandy invasion and is here today, and what an extraordinary story that is. [applause] members of the veterans of foreign wars, i am honored and humbled to stand before u.s. commander in chief of the finest military the world has ever known. [applause] we are joined by some of those who made it the finest force in the world. from the air force base, members of the 56th fighter wing. [applause] whether you wear the uniform today or war decades ago -- more expected to go, you are symbols of a fundamental truth is not powerful epidemic are military the strongest in the world, not the sophisticated systems that make us the most to danced. the true strength of our military lies in the spirit an
home training. immigration reform? this question came via e-mail at america's voice. during 2008, latino voters played and historic role turning four stage from red to blue. it's a defining issue for latino voters and president obama campaigned on a promise for this. how is he going to get comprehensive immigration reform done now. we've seen the dates flip a bit. what's doing on? >> what the president said throughout the campaign and in office is we have to have comprehensive immigration reform. my top person who is head of international governmental affairs, the question she asked before joining the administration is, is the president committed this and he absolutely is and he's pulled together members of congress, those who are supported of immigration reform and those who are not, brought them together in the white house and began to dialogue. we have someone working hard on the hill to see what measures we can do in the short-term but the real solution is long-term immigration reform. you mentioned the date has slipped. obviously there's a full plate but i think the preside
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
to the vfw on america's two foreign wars and the troops who are fighting them. you'll see it live right here in the "newsroom.." >>> two and a half months in the hurricane sen and bill and claude it light up the radar. hello, everyone. i'm kieyra phillips. you're live here in the "cnn newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> and they fought for you. who fights for them. american veterans focused health care. we're pushing forward on both fronts. a live address to the vfw in this hour and a congressional session of conservative opponents to the health plan. you know we've covered their causes and criseses to tainted equipment at v.a. hospitals. there are people stories, not number stories. we can't ignore numbers like these. almost a million unprocessed claims. if claims are denied it can take a year and a half, sometimes much longer to go through the appeals. factor in a passionate fight to overhaul the nation's health care system and this becomes the scene outside president's adegree. cnn's ed henry joins me live. how does it push into this for reform? we sure know they want it.
.m. e to one of america's most besieged outposted. the pilots won't land in this valley except on the darkest of nights when they're escorted by gunships. the taliban often lie and wait in the darkness of this remote valley. the gunships fire a missile into the hillside, a warning shot. outpost is the further reach of america power surrounded by mountains here in the pakistani border. a landing so the pilots worried that their razor blades could clip the hillside. this is the only way in or out of a tiny piece of land. america feels it has to hold on to but isn't sure why. and while the world's only superpower has found itself trapped. the hills all around offer beauty and also constant deadly attacks. >> we're surrounded in a bowl. so we're constantly -- >> reporter: captain porter leads a few dozen men pinned down among the sandbags. they don't have much contact with the locals apart from when they shoot at their base. >> over 35 contacts with the enemy since we've been here just under three months. so keeping us on our toes. >> reporter: why? >> my boss told me to come here.
to a surprise drop in america's jobless. a fresh conflict in georgia edging closer? welcome to bbc world news. it is broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you -- just like old times. hillary clinton looks up an old friend in south africa. [inaudible] >> and the comedy crunch. performers are making light of the global recession. hello to you. ed there are strong indications that pakistan's most wanted man, taliban commander baitullah mehsud, has been killed. he is believed to be leading al- qaeda's campaign to make pakistan ungovernable. sources have said that he is killed and buried, killed in a u.s. air strike on wednesday. this is from our correspondent in as, bob -- islamabad. >> baitullah mehsud is rarely seen in public. the white house has called him "a murderous thug." >> we have clear information that so far we do not have any evidence to confirm that he is dead. there were several killed during these attacks. these are indications. >> he is accused of masterminding the assassination of former prime minister benazir bhutto, as well as dozens of other att
looked around and i saw america. i saw white people and i saw black people. and i saw men and i saw women and i saw english-speakers and spanish-speakers in our caucus. our diversity is our strength. and when you have a diverse group the way you create solidarity is through shared values. the kind of discussion we have when a vote comes up that seems like a tough vote for me because the way my district is or because i just have problems with them on the basis of conscience, the discussion is always on the level of what's right, what's good, what's right, never, what's in it for me, what's in it for the leadership? it never takes that kind of turn. and the democrats don't vote as a single bloc and some close and some unpredictable. we had a couple that took a long time to vote. but the net result of that is that through our diversity, we have our strength. now, you compare that to the other side which seems to operate on completely different principles. doesn't have anything even remotely resembling diversity in our caucus and it seems to fight the very idea of diversity. i remember one si
of america's top enemies in afghanistan and pakistan. first, it is a "360" exclusive. in her first interview since her sister's return, lisa ling tonight joining us on "360" to talk about what's happened since her sister laura and her colleague, euna lee, came home from north korea. how they're re-adjusting and how euna's 4-year-old daughter hana is doing now that mommy is finally home. former president bill children securing their release. he spoke publicly about that trip for the first time today. but frankly, said very little. >> i wanted those young women to be able to come home. and i wanted our two countries to have the ability to decide where to go from here. it would be wrong for me to say any more. the young women can speak for themselves about their experiences. the pictures were worth a million words yesterday. i'm glad i could be of some help. >> pictures which seemed to capture the heart of a nation. since then, both families have been out of the public eye. tonight, though, lisa ling has been kind enough to give us a window into the moments since that plane touched down and som
for "newsweek" and chris of it, the deputy chief editor of the france press america wire service. john, let's start with you. critics of the review are sort of dismissing it already out of hand saying it is merely a budget drill and something that will define major budget cuts that will come down the pipe. is that fair? because there are hints we will get strategy out of this. aren't we? >> yes. i think the criticism is that it should be a budget drill. strategy review if it's untethered to the resources. i think it's likely to be more interesting than the last couple. because it does seem to be grappling with two separate problems. on two separate time frames. and the big problem out is the way is a european competitor, china that nobody talks about that. if so what do you do? how do you prepare? out there is the biggy. in the mean time there are the future of these mete wars. like iraq, afghanistan. and the future of what we call the global commons like piracy. which requires. >> and -- >> add stuff but my sense is that the two drivers in terms of project and force numbers are the ones i
would say donations. >> advertising for products. >> public money, i am short. >> by taxes? >> america's cable companies created c-span is a public service, a private business initiative -- note government mandate, no government money. >> the department has begun sending out the first tuition payments to universities but dissipating indeed post 9/11 g.i. bill -- participating in the post 9/11 g.i. bill program. more on that from jim webb, a co-sponsor the bill. we'll also hear from eric shinseki and president obama. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is an honored have you with us today and is an honor for us to host this important celebration. earlier this year, george mason was privileged to be one of the many colleges and universities across the nations to commit itself to the yellow ribbon enhancement program. a provision of the post 9/11 g.i. bill of 2008, this initiative is designed to extend higher education funding for servicemen and women who served after the september 11, 2001 attacks. i know that members of that day still remain in all of our hearts. shock, horror, a tragedy. f
that excited for anything. >>> for some of you, your local news is up next. >> for everyone else, "america this morning" continues after this. hi help you? we're shopping for car insurance, and our friends said we should start here. good friends -- we compare our progressive direct rates, apples to apples, against other top companies, to help you get the best price. how do you do that? with a touch of this button. can i try that? [ chuckles ] wow! good luck getting your remote back. it's all right -- i love this channel. shopping less and savingore. th'progressive. call or click today. clean so deep... ...it's like your old mop's worst nightmare. ♪ [ thunder crashes ] [ man ] love stinks. ♪ love stinks! ♪ yeah! yeah! [ female announcer ] swiffer wet cloths clean better than a mop with new cleansers that attract dirt deep into the cloth and lock it away. new swiffer wet cloths clean better, or your money back. ♪ love stinks! i felt this deep lingering pain that was a complete mytery to me. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia muscle pain and then he recommnded lyrica., fibromyalgi
that has always moved america forward nap means once again having the best educated, highest skilled workforce in the world. that means a health care system that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to innovate and businesses to compete without being saddled with skyrocketing insurance costs. >> reporter: there you have it. essentially what we are likely going to be hearing from president obama in the days and weeks to come. once again, t.j., trying to make his case and make his argument, that health care reform is an issue that cannot wait. that lawmakers have to tackle it sooner rather than later. t.j.? >> yeah, elaine. we know the president's making his kashgs but seems like the other side of the debate, you could almost argue, other democrats in a lot of ways. where do the republicans fit in and what do they have to say? just seems like this debate is going back and forth between democrats an democrats. >> reporter: you're absolutely right. a lot of this, deep divisions with the democratic party over this. conservative blue dog we heard about before, as well as progressive. for th
: and welcome to a very special edition of "hannity's america." -- of "hannity." hello, san diego. the site of our freedom concert and we have a big show in store. colonel oliver north will be here. former ms. california, carrie prejean, will be joined by the great one mark levine and our great american panel. and democrats are continuing their efforts to attack average americans who are speaking pout at town halls all across this country -- speak being out at town halls all across this country. they have been called angry mobs and dismissed as republican operatives. why are the democrats afraid of speech and can the strategy work? i'm joined by -- i call him the great one -- 12 weeks number one on "the new york times" best seller list, 17 weeks overall, liberty and tyranny, a conservative manifesto. great one, the great one. by the way, do you have a mob name? >> a mob name? i'm the shark. sean: you're the shark. he's the shark. are you all mobsters here? an angry mob. >> wait a minute. how many of you are insurance executives? raise your hand? how many of you here are -- what, car executi
. listen to make we need to recapture the spirit of innovation that has always moved america forward. that means once again having the best educated, highest skilled workforce in the world. that means a healthcare system that makes it possible for entrepreneurs to innovate and businesses to compete without being saddled with skyrocketing insurance costs. >> julie: the republicans continue to hammer away at the president's health-care proposal. if x. optical to senator johnston said obama's plan would not help healthcare at all. cnet republicans in congress know that serious health-care reform is a top priority of the american people. we are committed to getting it done. but we need to get the right reform, rather than just rush something through that would leave us in far worse shape in the future. >> julie: senator thune said he proposed plant would burden state governments and probably result in higher taxes. >> are called starting a racial controversy that reached all the way to the white house, but before all of that at first contributed to the arrest of a prominent harvard profe
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